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Women in the Martial Arts

This tag is associated with 10 posts

Remembering Yim Wing Chun, the Boxer Rebellion and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

      What at first appears new is often something remembered.  The human mind has trouble categorizing and finding meaning in anything that is truly unique or alien.  Good storytellers know that originality is not always a virtue.  The construction of meaning is rooted primarily in what we feel to be familiar.   The … Continue reading

Making Captain America: Martial Arts and the Next Generation

Captain America Thwarted   I spotted a flash of red, white and blue as I looked up from the electronic display mounted on the top of the treadmill.  It was telling me a depressing story of miles left to go.  But the sudden burst of excited kinetic energy suggested that things were about to get … Continue reading

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (15): Fei Ching Po – Professional Gambler and Female Martial Artist in Early 19th Century Guangzhou

  Introduction Stories of skilled female warriors have a long history in China. The legend of the Maiden of Yue illustrates these ancient roots.  Yet it was during the final decades of the Qing dynasty that the female martial artist really came into her own as a literary type. Vernacular operas, public storytellers, short stories … Continue reading

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: November 14th, 2014: Martial Arts Studies, Women in Kung Fu and the Taiping Institute is Back

      Introduction     Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News.”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing important events, this column also considers how the Asian hand combat systems are … Continue reading

The Boxing Master, the Pirate’s Wife and the Soldier: Three Scenes from Southern China’s Piracy Crisis, 1807-1810

    Introduction: Foreign Language Sources on Southern Chinese Piracy   It is a dictum in the social sciences that data is never self-interpreting. Likewise historians have found that it is often impossible to judge the nature or significance of events while one is caught up in the middle of them. Time must pass before … Continue reading

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: May 5th 2014: Wing Chun, Martial Religion and Shaolin Goes Wireless

  Introduction Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News.”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or impact the the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing important events, this column also considers how the Asian hand combat systems are portrayed in the … Continue reading

A Year in the Chinese Martial Arts: The Events and Stories that Shaped 2013, Part I

Introduction The New Year is upon us.  As such, it is a good time to sit back and reflect on the year’s accomplishments and events.  2013 has been a big year for the field of Chinese martial studies.  We have made progress in some areas, but there is still room for growth in others.  Likewise … Continue reading

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (11): Mok Kwai Lan – The Mistress of Hung Gar.

Introduction This post is the third entry in our series examining the lives of female Chinese martial artists.  While it is the case that the vast majority of hand combat practitioners in the 19th and 20th centuries were male, a certain number of women also adopted the art.  We started by looking at the life … Continue reading

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (10): Chen Shichao and Chen Gongzhe: Creating the Jingwu Revolution

  Introduction It is hard to think of any group or association that has had a greater effect on the emergence of the modern Chinese martial arts than the Jingwu Athletic Association.  Founded in Shangahi in the closing years of the Qing dynasty this institution was destined to become the first truly national “brand” within … Continue reading

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (9): Woman Ding Number Seven: Founder of the Fujian Yongchun Boxing Tradition

Introduction: Gender and the History of the Chinese Martial Arts Women are a challenging subject in Chinese martial studies.  One the one hand traditions about female boxers, nuns, bandits and heroes abound in the folklore of the “Rivers and Lakes.”  These stories are more common in some geographic locations and at certain times than others.  … Continue reading

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