Hunting a Tiger with a Kukri

  The reader will probably notice that whatever may be their form, there is a nameless something which designates the country in which they were produced.  No matter whether the weapon has belonged to a rich or a poor man, whether it be plain wood and iron, or studded with jewels and inlaid with gold,…

Towards The Motors of Tradition: A Report from the Field for Kung Fu Tea

By Daniel Mroz, Ph.D., University of Ottawa, Canada   ****I am very happy to introduce the following research report by my friend and colleague, Prof. Daniel Mroz of the University of Ottawa.  He has recently returned from conducting some fieldwork abroad and has agreed to outline his current research agenda for us.  His extensive experience…

Mythology of the Kukri: Sign and Symbol

Introduction: The Symbolic Language of Weapons Victor Turner, the cultural anthropologist, famously argued that all symbols are “multivocal,” meaning a single symbol can take on a multiplicity of meanings.  Humans have a way of looking at complexes of symbols, perhaps embedded in a ritual or a myth, and finding exactly the right mix of meaning…

Identifying and Collecting the Nepalese Military Kukri.

Introduction: The Traditional Military Kukri. New projects are always a learning experience, and one of the things that I have found most surprising here at Kung Fu Tea has been the persistent popularity of the one post which I wrote on the Nepalese kukri as a modern combat knife.  Perhaps I should have expected this. …