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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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Women and the Martial Arts

Lessons from the South – Martial Arts of Vietnam, Part II

  ***What follows in the second installment in our short guest series considering the history and development of the Vietnamese martial arts.  Enjoy****   Lessons from the South By Trần Khải Hoài   In the previous section, we looked at... Continue Reading →

Views from the South – Martial Arts of Vietnam, Part I

Giáng long thôi sơn (“Descending dragon presses the mountain”)—Vietnamese martial artists training amidst Cham ruins in Bình Định of southcentral Vietnam. Source:  ZingNews.   ***Greetings!  What follows is the first installment in a short series discussing the martial arts and martial culture of Vietnam.Trần Khải... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists: Qiu Jin—the Last Sword-Maiden, Part I.

  ***Greetings!  This was my first entry in the long running "Lives of Chinese Martial Artists" series. Rather than just profiling the most famous martial artists I attempted to look at the actual life experiences of a wide range of... Continue Reading →

Did Ip Man Invent the Story of Yim Wing Chun?

***Here is one of the first substantive posts that I ever wrote on Wing Chun for the blog back in 2012, about three years before my book (with Jon Nielson) came out. Wing Chun mythology is always a hot topic.... Continue Reading →

The Maiden of Yue and the Magnificent Chu

LK Chen's Magnificent Chu Jian. Source: LKChenswords.com   Rediscovering a Lost Sword Culture A single puzzle piece is useless on its own. Sometimes it takes one mystery to illuminate another.  Such is the case with the following text and sword.  Historians... Continue Reading →

Recreating the Han Dao and Battles on Bridges

The Emergence of the Dao “The Chinese martial arts that we practice today tend to be a recent phenomenon.” This is something that I have said on this blog many times, but what does it actually mean? Our earliest extent... Continue Reading →

Black Karate in the Chicago Ghetto, Localizing an Art

  Introduction Like so many others, I currently find it difficult to focus on the task at hand. Unlike most other people, the “happy place” I keep retreating to is the martial arts history of China’s Republic period (1912-1949). That... Continue Reading →

Failed Transformations: Peloton, Master Ken and Traditional Martial Arts

    Fitness and Agency Rose clippers are a key symbol within Judkins family folklore.  When I was about ten my mother bought my father, who does not garden, a set of rose clippers.  These have lived, unused, in a... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (9): Woman Ding Number Seven: Founder of the Fujian Yongchun Boxing Tradition

Introduction: Gender and the History of the Chinese Martial Arts Women are a challenging subject in Chinese martial studies.  One the one hand traditions about female boxers, nuns, bandits and heroes abound in the folklore of the “Rivers and Lakes.” ... Continue Reading →

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