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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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Women and the Martial Arts

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (11): Mok Kwai Lan – The Mistress of Hung Gar.

  ***In honor of the recent celebration of Mother's Day.  Enjoy!***   Introduction This post is the third entry in our series examining the lives of female Chinese martial artists.  While it is the case that the vast majority of... Continue Reading →

Bartitsu in the American Context

    Introduction   It is hard to think of a recent martial arts studies title that has been more successful in capturing the general public’s attention than Wendy Rouse’s (2017) Her Own Hero:The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement... Continue Reading →

Sophia Delza vs. The Black Belt Ethos: Post-Materialism in the Chinese Martial Arts

  T’ai Chi Ch’uan is not a by-product, as it were, of any other art-dance form; it is not derived from ancient Chinese commemorative dance [ritual], folk, or classical Chinese theatre dance [opera], and does not resemble them in dynamics,... Continue Reading →

Research Notes: No Girls Allowed

    Men fighting men to determine worth (i.e., masculinity) excludes women as completely as the female experience of childbirth excludes men….The female boxer violates this stereotype and cannot be taken seriously—she is parody, she is cartoon, she is monstrous.... Continue Reading →

Martial Mythology (1): Yim Wing Chun and the Hero’s Journey

  Introduction For someone who doesn’t read classical Chinese, I spend a lot of time in seminars listening to presentations on ancient texts.  Cornell regularly invites visiting scholars to discuss their work.  While none of these individuals has ever given... Continue Reading →

Bartitsu and Suffragette Jujitsu of the Early 20th Century

      Introduction   Greetings!  I am traveling for a conference and workshop where I will attempt to convince a group of political scientists that they should pay attention to Martial Arts Studies. (If you would like to see... Continue Reading →

Research Notes: Jingwu and the Female Martial Artists of 1920

    Introduction     I am interested in the frequent, seemingly unconscious, way in which the word “traditional” is appended to the name “martial arts” in modern speech and writing.  One does not simply study “Japanese wrestling” or “Chinese... Continue Reading →

Remembering Yim Wing Chun, the Boxer Rebellion and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

      What at first appears new is often something remembered.  The human mind has trouble categorizing and finding meaning in anything that is truly unique or alien.  Good storytellers know that originality is not always a virtue.  The... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (43): Chinese Amazons and the “Weapons of the Forefathers”

Wonder Woman with a Dadao     In China the realm of social violence, and the martial arts in particular, has been male dominated.  That does not mean that women never became a part of such activities.  After all, they... Continue Reading →

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