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Guest Posts

This category contains 58 posts

Doing Research (9): The Perils and Pitfalls of Performance Ethnography in the Martial Arts

    Introduction We are fortunate to be able to share the following guest post as part of our ongoing series on fieldwork in martial arts studies.  This essay, by D. S. Farrer, outlines a number of issues and pitfalls that young ethnographers should consider as they embark on their projects. Readers may recall that … Continue reading

Why do you draw the line? More on Definition in Martial Arts Studies

  ***Paul Bowman recently wrote an essay dealing with attempts to both define the martial arts and to think about the development of martial arts studies as a distinct field.  Given the importance of the points that he raises, and the amount of interest that they are likely to generate among readers of Kung Fu … Continue reading

The Immigrant Experience: Asian Martial Arts in the United States and Canada, by Joseph R. Svinth

    ***Happy Thanksgiving!  This is a day when we commemorate the initial act of European immigration to North America.  From that point onward the flow of people and ideas across our borders has never really stopped.  As such, it is impossible to appreciate the global spread of the traditional Asian martial arts without studying … Continue reading

(Insanity and) the Arts of Martial Minds

  ***Today we have a fascinating guest post by Paul Bowman.   It has been reblogged from Martial Arts Studies.  This essay outlines a new research project looking at questions of sanity and insanity within the practice of martial arts.  It is one of the most thought provoking things that I have read in a while.  … Continue reading

Lost Embodied Knowledge: Experimenting with Historical European Martial Arts out of Books by Daniel Jaquet

      Greetings!   If all has gone according to plan, I am now back in the United States and recovering after my recent trip to Germany.  As such, I would like to share with you another keynote addresses from this summer’s Martial Arts Studies conference in Cardiff as I work on on my … Continue reading

Taolu: Credibility and Decipherablility in the Practice of Chinese Martial Movement by Daniel Mroz

Greetings from an Airport Somewhere in Europe! I am currently in transit, returning from my recent visit with the 5th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Sport Science’s Martial Arts Commission at the Sports University of Cologne.  I hope to post a full report on the conference, as well as the text of my … Continue reading

What Can a Martial Body Do For Society? – Or, Theory Before Definition in Martial Arts Studies by Paul Bowman

    Greetings from Germany! I am current attending the 5th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Sport Science’s Martial Arts Commission at the Sports University of Cologne.  I will soon be delivering my keynote address (titled “Creating Wing Chun: Towards a Social History of the Southern Chinese Martial Arts.”)  This paper discusses my … Continue reading

How (not) to categorise martial arts: A discussion and example from gender studies

  ***Over the last couple of years a discussion has emerged within the literature on how scholars should define and classify the martial arts, and whether such efforts are even a good idea.  Alex Channon, a Senior Lecturer in Physical Education and Sports Studies at the University of Brighton, has generously agreed to contribute to … Continue reading

Multimedia Wing Chun: Learning and Practice in the Age of YouTube

      By George Jennings (Cardiff Metropolitan University, UK) and Anu Vaittinen (Newcastle University, UK)     Reference to conference presentation: Jennings, G. & Vaittinen, A. (2016). Mediated transformation: Interconnections between embodied training and multimedia resources in Wing Chun. Paper presented at the 2nd International Martial Arts Studies Conference, Cardiff University, UK, 19 July … Continue reading

James Yimm Lee and T. Y. Wong: A Rivalry that Shaped the Chinese Martial Arts in America

By Charles Russo, author of Striking Distance: Bruce Lee and the Dawn of Martial Arts in America (University of Nebraska Press, 2016).     So it Begins   At some point in late 1961, James Lee stormed out of the Kin Mon Physical Culture Studio in San Francisco’s Chinatown, effectively breaking off his tutelage under … Continue reading

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