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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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martial arts training manuals

16 Facts You (Probably) Didn’t Know About the Chinese Martial Arts, Part II

  Welcome to the second half of our discussion of 16 facts about the Chinese martial arts that you probably don’t know.  If you are just joining us for the first time this list is a playful attempt to highlight... Continue Reading →

A Lost Kung Fu Manual and the Nature of “Chinese Boxing”

  Introduction This is my keynote address from the recent (Nov. 9-10th, 2017) conference on fightbooks held at the German Blade Museum in Solingen.  A full report on this event is coming soon, but I am eager to share this... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (7): Selling Swords and Printed Martial Arts Training Manuals in a 19th century Guangzhou Market.

  ***Recently I was having a discussion about the state of Kung Fu in China with a friend.  (You can see his detailed post on the topic here).  He was lamenting the general decline of interest in the arts and... Continue Reading →

Kung Fu Tea Selects the Top Chinese Martial Arts Webpage of 2013

Introduction Welcome to our second annual discussion of the top webpages in Chinese martial studies.  The purpose of this series is to acknowledge some of the individuals who have made great contributions to our understanding of the traditional martial arts... Continue Reading →

The Book Club: Chinese Archery by Stephen Selby, Part II: Popular Texts, Qigong and the Military Exams.

  This is the second section of our two part discussion of Chinese Archery (2000, Hong Kong University Press) by Stephen Selby.  In part one we examined the first half of his book which covered the earliest written records of... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (7): Selling Swords and Printed Martial Arts Training Manuals in a 19th century Guangzhou Market.

Introduction: Exploring the martial marketplace. It is clear that the traditional Chinese martial arts, as practiced in the Qing dynasty, were many things to many people.  Still, for most of their practitioners they were first and foremost an economic resources. ... Continue Reading →

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