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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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Gender

Producing “Healthy Citizens”: Social Capital, Rancière and Ladies-Only Kickboxing

Question: Why did you choose kickboxing instead of some other sport? “Apparently it is a sport that we Moroccans like…We Moroccans need one or another outlet for our aggressions.” P. 40 Question: Why do you come to this school (far... Continue Reading →

Historical Fact vs. Social Discourse in the World of China’s 19th Century Martial Artists

      Introduction: What do historical documents reveal?     Students of martial arts studies often investigate the various “discourses” which surround these fighting systems. Such discussions turn to the media (movies, TV programs, video games, internet postings, wuxia... Continue Reading →

Alex Channon on the “Undoing” of Gender in Mixed-Sex Martial Arts Training

      Introduction: Is the Gendering of Practice Inevitable?     In the early 1990s I became a practitioner of a discipline that requires years of careful study and practice to master. It has its major schools, famous instructors... Continue Reading →

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: September 8th, 2014: Memory and Innovation in the Traditional Fighting Arts

  Introduction   Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News.”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing... Continue Reading →

The Boxing Master, the Pirate’s Wife and the Soldier: Three Scenes from Southern China’s Piracy Crisis, 1807-1810

    Introduction: Foreign Language Sources on Southern Chinese Piracy   It is a dictum in the social sciences that data is never self-interpreting. Likewise historians have found that it is often impossible to judge the nature or significance of... Continue Reading →

Liminality, Embodied Identity and the Paradox of the Invisible Female Martial Artists

  Men fighting men to determine worth (i.e., masculinity) excludes women as completely as the female experience of childbirth excludes men….The female boxer violates this stereotype and cannot be taken seriously—she is parody, she is cartoon, she is monstrous. Had... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (10): Chen Shichao and Chen Gongzhe: Creating the Jingwu Revolution

  Introduction It is hard to think of any group or association that has had a greater effect on the emergence of the modern Chinese martial arts than the Jingwu Athletic Association.  Founded in Shangahi in the closing years of... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (9): Woman Ding Number Seven: Founder of the Fujian Yongchun Boxing Tradition

Introduction: Gender and the History of the Chinese Martial Arts Women are a challenging subject in Chinese martial studies.  One the one hand traditions about female boxers, nuns, bandits and heroes abound in the folklore of the “Rivers and Lakes.” ... Continue Reading →

Ip Man and the Prostitute: Female Sexuality as a Weapon in Traditional Chinese Martial Culture.

  Introduction: Masculinity as a Core Value in the Traditional Southern Martial Arts. One of the few facts that everyone seems to “know” about Wing Chun is that the art was created by a female.  Whether this is actually true... Continue Reading →

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