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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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Shanghai

Research Note: A Visit with the Jingwu Association in 1928

  At the moment I am working on a guest editorial project examining Afro-Caribbean and New World martial arts.  It will pose a number of interesting questions and I hope to discuss some of these practices in greater depth.  Unfortunately,... Continue Reading →

Meditations on the Blade, Ultra-Modernity and the Fine Art of Self-Promotion

    The Unexpected Giant Some of the essays at Kung Fu Tea are the result of several days of careful research and thinking.  This is not going to be one of those pieces. I started out with a great... Continue Reading →

Research Notes: Han Xing Qiao Opens the “Internal Arts” to the West, 1934

        Introduction   On February 21, 1934, the North China Herald (the most popular English language newspaper published in China at the time) ran a remarkable article and interview titled the “Chinese Art of Boxing.”  The piece... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (38): A Tale of Two Swordsmen

      Introduction   In a recent post discussing the portrayal of the Asian martial arts in early 20th century Western newsreels, I called for a “media archeology” of the early imagery surrounding these fighting systems.  The following post... Continue Reading →

A Year in the Chinese Martial Arts: The Top Events and Stories that Shaped 2013, Part II

Introduction New Years is a time to take a moment to reflect on where we have been.  After all, the first step in making a useful resolution is to engage in a little self-reflection.  While this is certainly true for... Continue Reading →

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: November 4th, 2013: New York, Hong Kong and Shanghai

Introduction "Chinese Martial Arts in the News" is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea.  In these posts I attempt to round-up and briefly discuss the major stories affecting the world of the traditional Chinese fighting systems.  I always... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (17): “Selling the Art”: Martial Artists in the Marketplace, 1900-1930

  Introduction: Informants and the Problem of Reliability   The study of the traditional martial arts has tended to rely rather heavily on interviews with “participant informants.”  Cultivating relationships with informants and learning about their worldview consumes much of a... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (9): Swords, Knives and other Traditional Weapons Encountered by the Shanghai Police Department, 1925.

  Introduction: Practical Martial Arts in the Age of the Gun As I have mentioned elsewhere, when thinking about the traditional Chinese martial arts we have a tendency to assume that these systems were created in an era without firearms. ... Continue Reading →

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