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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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pirates

Martial Classics: The Complete Fist Canon in Verse

  Translator’s Note Here is the full translation of the Qi Jiguang’s Fist Method as it appears in the Wubei Zhi, offered as a follow-up to my initial discussion of the challenges of translating this text into English verse. If... Continue Reading →

War Junks, Pirates and the Commercialization of Chinese Martial Culture

    ***This will be the concluding post in our brief series on the role of southern China's maritime environment on the development and spread of the traditional martial arts.  Please see the end of this post for a complete list of... Continue Reading →

1849: Origins and Consequences of a Southern Chinese Piracy Crisis

    Introduction   By the early 19th century much of Guangdong province existed in a perpetual state of simmering anarchy. The large clan structures that dominated the agricultural economy competed with each other for access to land and water.... Continue Reading →

Happy Birthday Kung Fu Tea (!) and More on Butterfly Swords at Sea

    Kung Fu Tea Turns Two Years Old! Today is the second anniversary of my first post here at Kung Fu Tea.  The last two years have been a blast as well as something of a blur.  Looking back... Continue Reading →

The Boxing Master, the Pirate’s Wife and the Soldier: Three Scenes from Southern China’s Piracy Crisis, 1807-1810

    Introduction: Foreign Language Sources on Southern Chinese Piracy   It is a dictum in the social sciences that data is never self-interpreting. Likewise historians have found that it is often impossible to judge the nature or significance of... Continue Reading →

Book Club: Like Froth Floating on the Sea: The World of Pirates and Seafarers in Late Imperial South China.

    Robert J. Antony. 2003. Like Froth Floating on the Sea: The World of Pirates and Seafarers in Late Imperial South China. China Research Monograph 56. Berkeley, University of California: Institute of East Asian Studies. 198 pages.    ... Continue Reading →

The Chinese and their Rebellions: Thomas Taylor Meadows on Taiping Warfare and the Emergence of the Traditional Chinese Martial Arts.

Introduction: One Post, Two Research Programs. The current post hopes to make a contribution to two ongoing projects here at Kung Fu Tea.  The first of these research programs has already led to a number of posts, while the second... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (10): “They have a cannon?” Chinese Martial Arts Schools as Local Militia Units, 1896-1940.

Introduction I recently came across a very interesting photograph.  It was taken by the important (if under-appreciated) combat photographer Sha Fei sometime between 1938 and 1940.  At that point in time he was documenting the progress of the 8th Route... Continue Reading →

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