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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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marginality

Revisiting Marginality in the Martial Arts

  There are a number of popular topics within Martial Arts Studies which suggest the deeply interdisciplinary nature of our project.  Sociologists, following in the footsteps of Wacquant’s “Carnal Sociology” have invested much effort exploring notions such as habitus and embodiment... Continue Reading →

Rebellion and the Chinese Martial Arts

Rebel Yell Its hard to deny that there is something a bit subversive about the martial arts. Or maybe that’s not quite right. Dutiful law enforcement officers and loyal soldiers spend as much time actually training in these systems as... Continue Reading →

It is a bad idea to fall in love in a Kung Fu story. Honestly.

  Kung Fu and the Marriage Market Love and Kung Fu simply do not mix.  At least that is the strongly implied message to be found on the pages (and silver screens) of many traditional Chinese martial arts stories.  Things... Continue Reading →

Martial Arts Studies: Answering the “So what?” question

    “We now come to the most critical yet most prickly of all questions: does any of this matter beyond the martial arts and combat sports, symbolically rich but socially marginal activities after all…The greatest challenge that the fighting... Continue Reading →

Dr. Daniel Amos Discusses Marginality, Martial Arts Studies and the Modern Development of Southern Chinese Kung Fu

     Introduction We are very happy that Dr. Daniel M. Amos has been able to take the time to visit Kung Fu Tea.  In the following interview he discusses his research and shares some of his many insights on... Continue Reading →

Social Distrust and the Chinese Martial Artist

      Introduction: Kung Fu and Marginality     While writing the recent article on Ark Yuey Wong, I had an opportunity to chat with Charles Russo.  He has been doing research on the history of the Chinese martial... Continue Reading →

Book Club: Like Froth Floating on the Sea: The World of Pirates and Seafarers in Late Imperial South China.

    Robert J. Antony. 2003. Like Froth Floating on the Sea: The World of Pirates and Seafarers in Late Imperial South China. China Research Monograph 56. Berkeley, University of California: Institute of East Asian Studies. 198 pages.    ... Continue Reading →

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