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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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law enforcement

Through a Lens Darkly (32): The Chinese Police and the Romance of the Sword

    The Creation of Beijing's Police   Given that this is a holiday weekend, what follows is brief but topical. Labor Day is an ideal time to look back and remember some of the hard working individuals who helped... Continue Reading →

Tools of the Trade: The Use of Firearms and Traditional Weapons among the Tongs of San Francisco, 1877-1878.

  Introduction: The Evolving Relationship between Firearms and the Martial Arts. In a number of previous posts we have examined the complex, often hidden, relationship between the development of the modern Chinese martial arts and firearms.  It is frequently stated... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (9): Swords, Knives and other Traditional Weapons Encountered by the Shanghai Police Department, 1925.

  Introduction: Practical Martial Arts in the Age of the Gun As I have mentioned elsewhere, when thinking about the traditional Chinese martial arts we have a tendency to assume that these systems were created in an era without firearms. ... Continue Reading →

Ip Man and the Roots of Wing Chun’s “Multiple Attacker” Principle, Part 2.

Introduction and Review This is the second part of an extended article on Ip Man's career in law enforcement, and the subsequent emphasis on "ambush" and "multiple attacker" scenarios that later developed in his lineage of Wing Chun.  See here... Continue Reading →

Ip Man and the Roots of Wing Chun’s “Multiple Attacker” Principle, Part 1.

Law Enforcement and the Martial Arts in Republican China The intersection between law enforcement and the development of the modern Chinese martial arts is a fascinating topic that deserves a lot more attention than it normally gets.  In many ways... Continue Reading →

A Social and Visual History of the Dadao: The Chinese “Military Big-Saber.”

Rediscovering the Dadao: A Forgotten Legacy of the Chinese Martial Arts. Any review of the history of the Chinese martial arts in the 20th century will quickly suggest that these civilian art forms have, at various points, been co-opted and... Continue Reading →

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