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Judo

This tag is associated with 12 posts

Bartitsu and Suffragette Jujitsu of the Early 20th Century

      Introduction   Greetings!  I am traveling for a conference and workshop where I will attempt to convince a group of political scientists that they should pay attention to Martial Arts Studies. (If you would like to see my presentation click here).  As such, I have arranged something special for Kung Fu Tea … Continue reading

Through a Lens Darkly (44): Martial Arts in Pre-War Japanese Schools

    Introduction   Today’s post is the result of a happy coincidence.  As regular readers will be aware, I occasionally collect and share vintage images of the Chinese martial arts.  Many of these come from the sorts of ephemera (postcards, advertisements, old newspaper clippings, newsreels) that contain interesting data on the social place of … Continue reading

Defining Wing Chun by What is “Missing”

      An all too Common Conversation     Last week my Sifu and I were discussing the public conversation that surrounds Wing Chun.   “So this guy was trying to tell me that we have no head movement in Wing Chun.  Not just bobbing and weaving” he clarified “but that we can literally … Continue reading

The Immigrant Experience: Asian Martial Arts in the United States and Canada, by Joseph R. Svinth

    ***Happy Thanksgiving!  This is a day when we commemorate the initial act of European immigration to North America.  From that point onward the flow of people and ideas across our borders has never really stopped.  As such, it is impossible to appreciate the global spread of the traditional Asian martial arts without studying … Continue reading

Who “Owns” Kung Fu? Intangible Cultural Heritage, Globalization and the Decentering of the Asian Martial Arts

    “Inoue said the Japanese style of judo traditionally focused more on quantity rather than quality, trying to instill a tough mentality. But in Europe, which Inoue describes as “the mainstream of judo today,” judoka train more efficiently. “A balance between efficiency and inefficiency and a balance between scientific things and unscientific things — … Continue reading

Research Notes: The Chinese and Japanese Martial Arts as Seen on Western Newsreels

    “In the west, Asian martial arts are everywhere.  They are part of the texture of popular consciousness.  Nonetheless I want to argue that they remain marginal.  That is to say, although Westerners may see them often, and all over the place, they are not simply the norm.” -Paul Bowman, “the Marginal Movement of … Continue reading

Through a Lens Darkly (34): The Chinese and Japanese Martial Arts in WWII-era Japanese Military Postcards

  Introduction   The martial arts can speak to a number of important questions, but perhaps to none as directly as popular attitudes towards violence. Much of my recent research has looked at what the organization of martial arts groups in China reveals about the nature of social conflict. Yet for those who share my … Continue reading

Guest Post: Grappling with History – Martial Arts in Classical Hollywood Cinema

      Introduction   Upon the gracious invitation from Dr. Judkins, I thought about what I could add to a historical perspective on the martial arts. After considering various topic ideas, I settled on the topic of martial arts in the context of American cinema, in particular the classical Hollywood cinema. In academic film … Continue reading

The Book Club: Martial Arts and the Body Politic in Meiji Japan (Chapter 3): Capture the Flag – Spectacle and Rhetoric in the Japanese Martial Arts.

“I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys. He becomes a sort of hollow, posing dummy, the conventionalized figure of a sahib. For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the “natives,” and … Continue reading

The Book Club: Martial Arts and the Body Politic in Meiji Japan: Introduction – Chapter 2

  Denis Gainty. 2013. Martial Arts and the Body Politic in Meiji Japan. New York: Routledge.   Introduction In this post I have the distinct pleasure of discussing Prof. Gainty’s work on the relationship between the martial arts, embodied identity, agency and nationalism in Japan during the Meiji period. This is an exciting project for … Continue reading

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