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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

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Guangzhou

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (24): Wen Shengcai, Wing Chun’s Assassin

  On Legends and their Grains Not all legends contain a grain a truth. Such an assertion is wishful thinking and sells short the remarkable faculty that is the human imagination. Still, grains manifest frequently enough that they keep historians... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (23): Fu Zhen Song – Southbound Tiger

  History as the cure for Ideology Everyone has a personal mental image of the Chinese martial arts.  The detail may vary, but there are some undeniably common elements.  Grainy photos, complex postures, exotic weapons, strangely vigorous old men. The... Continue Reading →

1920: Jingwu Brings Kung Fu to Guangzhou’s Public Schools

  It goes by many names. Organization, bureaucracy…”hard work”… It’s the sort of social effort that defines modern industrialized life. Weber famously termed it the “iron cage” of rationality. We so frequently speak of, or imagine, the martial arts as... Continue Reading →

Regional Histories, Localization and the Chinese Martial Arts

  Regulating Kung Fu in Canton The brave new world of electronic databases and digital humanities is certainly opening many doors to new and exciting types of research.  Increasingly scholars can sit down at any university terminal and access previously... Continue Reading →

Li Pei Xian and the Evolution of Modern Chinese “Martial Arts”

    ***Greetings! I am currently preparing for the upcoming Martial Arts Studies conference in Cardiff.  As such we will be taking a deep dive into the archives for today's post.  This essay and biographical sketch was first published four... Continue Reading →

Villains, Guns and Humor: Giving Texture to the Early 19th Century Chinese Martial Arts

      Any traveler can attest that detours come in two forms.  They all take a little longer, and most offer nothing but delay.  Others can lead to fascinating discoveries.  These often come in the form of local sandwich... Continue Reading →

From the Archives: Understanding Opium Use among Southern Chinese Martial Artists, 1890-1949

  ***I am in the middle of a reading project to prepare for some up-coming posts here at Kung Fu Tea.  As such I have decided turn to the archives for this Friday's post.  This essay was initially written to... Continue Reading →

Kung Fu is Dead, Long Live Kung Fu: The Martial Arts as Voluntary Associations in 20th Century Guangzhou

  Introduction   Daniel M. Amos is one of the less appreciated, but more important, voices in the academic study of the southern Chinese martial arts. In 1983 he deposited a doctoral dissertation at the University of California, Los Angeles,... Continue Reading →

“Anti-Foreignism” and the Southern Chinese Martial Arts

  Introduction: Anti-Foreignism in Republican Guangdong Students of the traditional Chinese martial arts are frequently reminded that until very recently these systems were “closed” to outsiders.  Then, in the wake of Bruce Lee, Kung Fu masters around the world decided... Continue Reading →

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