Season’s Greetings!

Happy Holidays! Merry Christmas and a Happy New year to all of Kung Fu Tea’s readers.  Thanks so much for your support and feedback over the last year.  I think that my friend Bernard, the Kung Fu Elf, left one or two things under the tree for me.  Hopefully I will be able to keep…

Essential Kung Fu Cinema (3): A Touch of Zen

***I am very happy to welcome Rob Argent back to Kung Fu Tea.  This is the third post in his ongoing series introducing some of the essential Kung Fu films which have helped to define the genera.  The first discussed a film that helped to launch Bruce Lee onto the global stage. The second examined…

Through a Lens Darkly (19): China’s other Swords during World War II.

Introduction It is clear that weapons training is enjoying a renaissance within the modern martial arts community.  Recently some of this attention has come to focus on the blades of the Second World War.  It is interesting to speculate on why these weapons were surging in popularity in the Asian theater at exactly the time…

Understanding Opium Use among Southern Chinese Martial Artists, 1890-1949.

Introduction: Wu Song Beats the Tiger One of the fascinating, yet also frustrating, aspects of Chinese popular culture is the facility with which it generates rich new vocabularies to describe the everyday minutia of life.  In some areas, most famously among Republic era criminal groups, these quirks of language could become almost an independent dialect. …