William Chen: Introducing Americans to Taijiquan in the Summer of 1965

“I trained under William Ch’en in Taiwan and in New York City. He fools you. Meek, slender, and quiet, he might be a scholar or a student of the Book of Changes, never a boxer.….He is so relaxed that he appears to have no bones.” R.W. Smith Chinese Boxing: Masters and Methods. Kodansha International. 1971….

Through a Lens Darkly (29): Savate: French Kickboxing and the Military

        Introduction     I recently discussed an account of the Chinese martial arts in late 19th century which was provided by the American diplomat, explorer, scientist and scholar William Woodvile Rockhill. While buying supplies for an upcoming expedition through western China and Tibet he recoded the following note in his journal:…

From the Archives: The Creation of Wing Chun’s “Opera Rebels.”

***This weekend my wife and I will be away celebrating our anniversary.  As such we will be delving into the archives for our normally scheduled Friday update. The following was the first post in a three part series looking at Cantonese Opera in Chinese popular culture and its connections with the southern Chinese martial arts. …

Ji Gong: The Adventures of a Mad Monk in Chinese Martial Arts Fiction

Guo Xioting. Trans. John Robert Shaw. Adventures of the Mad Monk Ji Gong. Rutland VT: Tuttle. 2014. 542 Pages. Introduction: Meeting Crazy Ji Inscription on the Sarira Relics of the Recluse from the Lake, Elder Fangyuan (Square-Circle), Jidian (Crazy Ji) …. The elder was from Tiantai County in Linhai prefecture [in modern Zhejiang]. He was…