//
archives

Archive for

Death, Taxes and the Inevitability of Change in the Chinese Martial Arts: A Historical Case

    Introduction   How should we understand China’s traditional martial arts? Minimal observation will reveal that these are multifaceted social institutions whose interactions with popular culture are complex and ever changing. Still, as Douglas Wile has noted, when discussing hand combat practices there is a strong tendency to see any event that occurred prior … Continue reading

War Junks, Pirates and the Commercialization of Chinese Martial Culture

        ***This will be the concluding post in our brief series on the role of southern China’s maritime environment on the development and spread of the traditional martial arts.  Please see the end of this post for a complete list of links.  A special note of thanks goes to Dr. Hans Konrad Van … Continue reading

Through a Lens Darkly (25): A Sawback Dadao in Hangzhou

    The Album   Recently I had the good fortune to come across a photograph of a Chinese dadao (big knife) that dates to the late 1930s. Images such as these were sometimes collected by Japanese soldiers in occupied China and subsequently ended up back in Japan. Obviously photos of Chinese martial artists and … Continue reading

Remembering Chu Shong Tin and the Relationship between Theory and Observation in Chinese Martial Studies

    Introduction – The Loss of Chu Shong Tin   A few weeks ago the Wing Chun community lost one of its leading lights. It is hard to overstate Master Chu Shong Tin’s contributions to the emergence and preservation of the modern Wing Chun movement. Best remembered as Ip Man’s “third disciple” (and at … Continue reading

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 10th, 2014: Turtles, Dragons and the Passing of Master Chu Shong Tin

    Introduction Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News.”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing important events, this column also considers how the Asian hand combat systems are portrayed in … Continue reading

1849: Origins and Consequences of a Southern Chinese Piracy Crisis

    Introduction   By the early 19th century much of Guangdong province existed in a perpetual state of simmering anarchy. The large clan structures that dominated the agricultural economy competed with each other for access to land and water. As often as not these unique organizations (combining both the gentry’s leadership and the peasant’s … Continue reading

Professor Thomas Green on the Survival of Plum Blossom Boxing, Martial Folklore and the State of Martial Arts Studies

    Introduction   Professor Thomas A. Green (Anthropology, Texas A&M University) has been a critical figure in the promotion of the academic study of the martial arts. Many readers will already be familiar with his edited works (along with Joseph Svinth) including Martial Arts in the Modern World (Praeger, 2003) and Martial Arts of … Continue reading

Two Encounters with Bruce Lee: Finding Reality in the Life of the Little Dragon

      John Little (ed.) 2000. Bruce Lee: The Celebrated Life of the Golden Dragon. Rutland: Tuttle Publishing.   Tommy Gong. 2014. Bruce Lee: The Evolution of a Martial Artist, 2nd edition. Black Belt Books, a Division of Ohara Publications, inc.     “Remembering” Bruce Lee, for the First Time   It seems that … Continue reading

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,892 other followers