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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

Month

October 2013

Essential Kung Fu Cinema (1): Fists of Fury

By Rob Argent ***I am very happy to welcome Rob Argent back to Kung Fu Tea.  Rob's first guest post was a study of the martial arts in video games which he contributed to the 2013 Web Symposium on Chinese... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (11): Mok Kwai Lan – The Mistress of Hung Gar.

Introduction This post is the third entry in our series examining the lives of female Chinese martial artists.  While it is the case that the vast majority of hand combat practitioners in the 19th and 20th centuries were male, a... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (17): “Selling the Art”: Martial Artists in the Marketplace, 1900-1930

  Introduction: Informants and the Problem of Reliability   The study of the traditional martial arts has tended to rely rather heavily on interviews with “participant informants.”  Cultivating relationships with informants and learning about their worldview consumes much of a... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (10): Chen Shichao and Chen Gongzhe: Creating the Jingwu Revolution

  Introduction It is hard to think of any group or association that has had a greater effect on the emergence of the modern Chinese martial arts than the Jingwu Athletic Association.  Founded in Shangahi in the closing years of... Continue Reading →

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: October 14th, 2013: Kung Fu Diplomacy, Qi in the Western World and Saving the Chinese Martial Arts Film.

Introduction Welcome to another edition of Chinese Martial Arts in the news.  This is a semi-regular feature in which we review a roundup of media stories dealing with the martial arts over the last three to four weeks.  We try... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (9): Woman Ding Number Seven: Founder of the Fujian Yongchun Boxing Tradition

Introduction: Gender and the History of the Chinese Martial Arts Women are a challenging subject in Chinese martial studies.  One the one hand traditions about female boxers, nuns, bandits and heroes abound in the folklore of the “Rivers and Lakes.” ... Continue Reading →

Folklore in the Southern Chinese Martial Arts: A Means to Create Economic “Value” or to Construct Social “Values?”

I found that I could not analyze ritual symbols without studying them in a time series in relation to other “events,” for symbols are essentially involved in social process.  I came to see performance of ritual as distinct phases in... Continue Reading →

Leveraging Open Courseware in Chinese Martial Studies

Introduction: Technology, Disruption and Education The current renaissance in the academic study of the martial could not have come at a better time.  In fact, it is probably a powerful confluence of forces, both theoretical, political and technological that are... Continue Reading →

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