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Kung Fu Tea

Martial Arts History, Wing Chun and Chinese Martial Studies.

Month

September 2012

Kung Fu Tea: Now on Facebook!

You can now follow Kung Fu Tea on Facebook! I had resisted creating a Facebook page as I felt that a traditional blog was a better fit for my format.  As regular readers know most of my posts are short... Continue Reading →

Wing Chun and the Hakka Arts: Is there a connection?

  Categorizing the Martial Arts of Southern China As I have discussed here, there are a number of different ways that one can conceptualize the traditional martial arts of Guangdong province and the Pearl River delta.  One of the more... Continue Reading →

Teaching Chinese Martial Studies and Talking about Martial Arts in the Classroom.

By my count we are in the third era of "Chinese Martial Studies."  The first was spearheaded by Tang Hao and ran from the early 20th century to WWII.  The scholars interested in the martial arts were mostly from China... Continue Reading →

Chinese Archery Resources

Traditional Chinese Archery Resources Yeah, I have been bitten by the bug.  It seems that archery, in all its many forms, is a hot commodity.  Between the "Hunger Games" and "Brave" it has gotten a huge amount of free publicity. ... Continue Reading →

“Wing Chun: A Documentary” directed by Jon Braeley.

Empty Mind Films has produced some of the highest quality and most engaging martial arts documentaries seen anywhere in the last few years.  They are a small organization, and as a result they are selective about the projects they take... Continue Reading →

Why Religion Needs to Play a Greater Role in Chinese Martial Studies than it does in the Chinese Martial Arts.

  Lately I have been thinking about the role of religion in the Chinese martial arts and the different (though related) question of its place in Chinese martial studies.  I blame Stanley Henning. I should preface this post by saying... Continue Reading →

Through a Lens Darkly (3): Chinese Martial Artists in a Local Marketplace

Our image for this week (two of them actually) come from J. A. Hammerton's encyclopedic People of All Nations (volume 5, circa 1920).  I don't normally condone cutting up of old books.  I had actually attempted to buy just the... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists: Qiu Jin—the Last Sword-Maiden, Part II.

  This post provides the conclusion to our biographical sketch of Qiu Jin, an important southern Chinese revolutionary, poet, writer, martial artist and terrorist.  I think the best way to read these posts is to print them out and read... Continue Reading →

Lives of Chinese Martial Artists: Qiu Jin—the Last Sword-Maiden, Part I.

  Anachronism and Misunderstanding in the Chinese Martial Arts This is the first post in a new occasional series here at “Kung Fu Tea.”  These entries will provide brief biographies, and pose some thoughtful questions, about the lives of China’s... Continue Reading →

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